Samode Palace Hotel in India

The magnificent samode palacehotel, which is located in India,is a real palace, and in the truest sense of the word. Earlier, in ancient times there was an ancient military fort. Then the hotel served as a private residence of the royal family.

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Location and infrastructure

The building of the hotel has undergone numerous restorations until it turned into a real masterpiece of architecture. In general, in India, the transformation of ancient palaces and fortresses into luxury hotels has become almost a tradition.

In its design, some of the most expensive materials were used: wood of the most valuable species, marble, expensive carpets.

Room stock

The hotel will welcome its guests with a pleasant romantic atmosphere. In total, the hotel has 43 rooms of different comfort classes. Each of them is decorated in the national style and is equipped with beautiful and comfortable furniture. Initially, the hotel served as a private residence of the royal family.

Durbar Hall reception room with original ceiling paintings is a real pride of the samode Palace hotel. The walls and ceilings of the hotel are lined with mosaics of mirrors, pieces of which make up a bizarre mosaic. Samode Palace apartments are all different, but they are all equally chic.

For example, a room with an impressive marble staircase, equipped with a shower cabin with a glass wall, which opens onto a terrace where in turn a magical view of the mountains opens.

Royal apartments will delight with a chic jacuzzi and a private garden.

Food

The restaurant, the menu of which includes dishes of Indian and European cuisine, will satisfy not only the taste of any gourmet, but also sweeten his gaze and ear with the waterfall and the chirping of songbirds. The Samode Palace Hotel is a place to enjoy without getting tired.

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Alina Abramova

Be travelers, not tourists. Try new things, meet new people, and go beyond what's right in front of your nose. These are the keys to understanding this amazing world we live in. (c) Andrew Zimmern